Thursday, March 31, 2016

Sci Fri: Homemade Gingerale


Homemade Gingerale has nothing to do with Worm Week.
However, it was a fun experiment for Sci Fri that grew out of necessity (upset tummy!)
http://ohsheglows.com/2013/04/01/undiet-review-recipe-giveaway-valued-at-300/ 
We used a 2L bottle of Club Soda, removed 2 cups and tripled the ginger mixture, so we could make it right in the bottle.
NOTE: If you are adding the ginger mixture to the carbonated water bottle, try doing it over the sink. I did not! Science happened right before our eyes and all over our floor;) 
NOTE 2: Club soda is actually artificially carbonated. If you prefer a more natural bubbly water, mineral water would work too.


The recipe was close enough to a 'mild' gingerale taste.
I'm sure the critics would have accepted a sweeter version (adding more honey!)

EXPAND ON HOMEMADE GINGER CONCOCTIONS
Homemade Gingerale. http://www.kitchenstewardship.com/2014/02/20/recipe-connection-honey-sweetened-ginger-ale-guest-post/#_a5y_p=1838017
Ginger Syrup. http://www.thetipgarden.com/2012/04/gingerale-syrup.html

Wiggly Tissue Worms


This project was awesome!
http://www.daniellesplace.com/html/worm-crafts-learning-activities.html#growing
Luckily I cut a large stack of tissue paper, because we all wanted to witness the worms in action, again and again.

There is a trick to getting a good tissue worm, that took more than several tries to figure out!
It's in how loosely to roll the tissue paper around a very stiff straw. Rolling too tight will not allow you to be able to pinch it well enough to get good results once the water is added by dropper.

We also learned by 'accident' that putting the pinched worm on a wet spot, also results in some very cool expanding! We even had one worm lift it's head right up off the table!


While we were working on making the worms move, O was conducting her own experiment; extracting pink dye from the tissue paper!

Pink Handed

Invertebrate's


Such a sweet and easy demonstration of Invertebrate's by 'Halfway Homeschooling' http://halfwayhomeschooling.blogspot.ca/2013/02/w-learning-alphabet-hiding-worm-craft.html

We used a toilet paper roll, a wooden toy bull and a silk scarf to learn how worms have no bones.
They also have no eyes or ears and very little brain, yet they are the most crucial insects to life on Earth.


Monday, March 28, 2016

Early Birds


We opted out of the whipped cream and gummie worms and replaced them with Chocolate Mousse and spaghetti! http://madsmemories.blogspot.ca/2010/10/coolest-halloween-party.html


For a little girl who eats actual dirt and kisses real live worms, Baby C was not impressed that we asked her to fish out worms without using her hands!


She was concerned that the Chocolate Mousse would go up her nose!


O on the other hand, dove right in!


And Baby C then followed suit and had a lot of fun getting messy!





EXPAND ON WORMS.
Best Worm Picture Books.

Worms by Bernard Friot. This is a funny tale about a boy who is forced to sit through a boring business dinner his father is hosting. When he is asked to bring in the salads, he adds a worm to each bowl and is entertained by the guests reactions! A BIG HIT!
O tells us that she is going to do something tricky next time we eat salad, but she is not going to tell us what!
 



Wormery


Grandpa has an old brown sugar jar that served as the perfect Wormery jar!
With some beautiful black soil and play sand, we layered in an AB AB pattern, to witness the worms at work. 'Frugal Fun 4 Boys' has some fantastic tutorial pictures. http://frugalfun4boys.com/2014/04/01/make-worm-observation-jar/


O and Baby C collected the creatures and tore dead leaves into shreds.



Once indoors, the worms quickly burrowed through the sand and soil. We covered the outside of the Wormery with black construction paper, to trick the worms into thinking they were actually 'underground'.


Within an hour, we could witness the tunnels being created!
Make a list of favourite worm food and add compost to the top of your wormery.

EXPAND ON WORMERY's
Worm Food/Feeding Instructions. Scroll down for the list of Do's & Do Not's. https://www.milkwood.net/2012/07/10/vertigation-passive-injection-worm-juice-irrigation-for-the-kitchen-garden/
Wormery for the Homesteader. This is a beautiful design for a backyard wormery (you can even use the worm juice on your garden!) http://www.abgc.ie/design/wormery
Worm Towers. Underground wormery tutorials. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/345229127667060522/
Worm Compost Bin. http://www.hometalk.com/4877799/worm-composting-bin-ideas-tutorials
What's an Earthworm Worth? http://www.turfgrowers.co.uk/earth-worm-infographic 



 

Vegan Bites: Lasagna Layers


"What does 'layers' mean?"
"Things on top of each other!"
Before we began our Wormery, we created Lasagna Layers with the ABC ABC pattern.
Each O & Baby C had their own pan for layering lasagna (A), veggies of their choice (B) and sauce (C).


We could distinguish which lasagna belonged to Baby C, as she left her mark!

EXPAND ON VEGGIE LASAGNA

Worm Spaghetti


Lowly Worm created by Richard Scarry, has his own story.
The inside cover features him bending for the 26 letters of the alphabet.


We used spaghetti worms to form the alphabet (and prep the pasta for our Early Bird activity!)

http://www.myoatmealkisses.com/2012/01/letter-w-worms.html 

Squiggly Worm


We're kicking off Worm Week with the game of Squiggly Worm; wiggling a rope on the ground to jump over.



O was all over this game, while Baby C needed to witness a few rounds before taking part.


Saturday, March 26, 2016

Sci Fri: Egg-speriments


Last year our 3 for 1 Egg-speriments had a more hands (and feet!!)-on approach http://mamadrool.blogspot.ca/2015/04/3-for-3-egg-speriments.html
This year we took a page from Playdough to Plato for our 3 in 1 seasonal egg-speriments.
http://www.playdoughtoplato.com/cool-science-experiments/
Just as interesting, but involving more observation.

Naked Egg

The Naked Egg involves submersing a raw egg in each a mug of H20 and vinegar.
After about three days, the vinegar soaked egg has shed it's shell, increased in size and become a bouncy ball!
Something Baby C was quick to discover!
 
Homemade Bouncy Ball
 

The second and third experiments involved submersing the Naked Egg in corn syrup, which shrinks your bouncy ball and adding food colour and water, which makes your bouncy egg expand again.

Dino Eggs


Thanks to Grandma & Grandpa's Chirp Magazine subscription, we chanced upon these Dino Eggs!

EXPAND ON EGG-TIVITIES
http://tinkerlab.com/60-egg-activities-for-kids/

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Crepe Carrots & Bunny Surprise Balls


This project was too sweet to pass up!
You can opt for Crepe Paper Carrots
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/345229127660494583/
or Carrot Cones
http://www.we-are-scout.com/2013/03/printable-cute-carrot-easter-treat-bags.html
We bought some rectangular fruit leathers and cut stickers into long strips, as the center surprise.
Since we couldn't find only orange crepe, we used Rainbow Crepe Paper and did our first few rounds in various colours before finishing off with orange. Add a tuft of green for carrot tops and you have yourself a little Spring Surprise!


Our next gift attempt were Bunny Surprise Balls.
http://www.craftaholicsanonymous.net/easter-bunny-surprise-balls
http://www.artsyville.com/2011/06/surprise-balls.html
I did a sample, but honestly, Baby C in her haphazard rolling fiasco, made an awesome ball (mine was more of a flattened orb!) We then glued on ears before O and Baby C added details to the bunny faces.


Rainbow Crepe is gorgeous on it's own! Last year we used them to make Mini Pinata's (that I swore I would never again attempt!) http://mamadrool.blogspot.ca/2015/04/mini-crepe-paper-pinatas.html


Inside the Bunny Ball's we opted for a wee bag of Bunny Tails (a.k.a. Vegan Marshmallows)

Daily Doodle: Raining Eggs


An easy peasy art and nature project with the help of a little rain.
The day started as rain but turned into snow; the experiment still worked, but the effects were delayed until we brought the drawing indoors and the snow melted in front of our eyes.


Simply use an art medium that bleeds well (washable markers!) or test other mediums for a little science project. Place outdoors on a rainy or snowy day and watch the water make it's own artwork.